From the Workshop

March 27, 2019

Workshop blog no 20 – No 985

Filed under: No 985,Window to my workshop — Tags: , , , — admin @ 10:30 am

I was hoping to get my handles underway this week, but decided to complete the chassis first as the handles will need tweaking when I have an assembled plane.

The start of the front bun, drilling, tapping and counter bore ready to go on to the turning abor. This is the same fit as the fixing bush. Which is another hidden job.

CI3A5326

This operation is usually done on the manual mill as the thread cutting is best done by hand for better sensitivity and ensuring sharp and clean threads. More on this later.

CI3A5343

With reluctance I have put the wood working on hold and moved the chassis forward. Here is the holding fixture awaiting programming and tooling.

CI3A5353

February 22, 2019

Workshop blog 11 – No 985

Filed under: No 985,Window to my workshop — Tags: , , , — admin @ 2:17 pm

This is the making of the milling fixture to profile the No 985 sides. When I bought this machine the salesman said it had screw cutting but I never ever found it. It is important to do the screw cutting whilst everything is still in the machine; I have to move into each hole co-ordinate and cut the threads by hand.

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10 years later ……

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February 19, 2019

Workshop blog 9 – No 985

Just starting to drill the No 985 sides and as usual I start off with test samples.

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The fixture holes for the plane sides, looks like an awful lot of holes! All holes are tapered for retention.

CI3A5145

December 14, 2018

New Workshop 5

Filed under: No 98 plane,Window to my workshop — Tags: , , , — admin @ 11:27 am

I have decided to put my blade chamfering onto the No 98 blade, it does set off a low angle plane – ergonomic and aesthetically. It is a lot of work, especially finding 30 deg chamfering tools (a 45 deg just doesn’t look right). The polishing is very time consuming. I have to do the polishing before I send them off to heat treatment, then I only need to buff the edges and surface grind when they come back.

No 98 blade chamfer

December 4, 2018

New Workshop Blog 3

No 98 bronze lever caps

lever caps

These are the last lever caps of this type. I also used them on my mitre planes. Gone forever as the foundry closed down and my patterns are lost.

profiling cut on lever cap

After preparation including flattening, squaring etc, the profile is cut out.

No 98 lever cap part machined

The lever caps after profiling also showing centering hole to be bored to make ready for tapping

No 98 lever cap 7a

Tapping after the boring

no 98 lever cap 13

The machining for the keep recesses so the lever cap can be released after 2-3 turns on the thumb screw

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Ready for final shaping and polishing

November 26, 2018

New Workshop blog 1 (post retirement ????)

Filed under: No 98 plane,Window to my workshop — Tags: , , , — admin @ 4:14 pm

During the course of finishing off bits and pieces out of the back of the cupboard I decided I would put together some more No 98 planes. I was horrified to find not all the pieces there. However, I had already promised a plane to someone so I need to get on with it.

I am just making components as I need them. I will start with some pictures of the adjuster boss and post as I go. This No 98 plane was the start of my own designs (and the start of bevel up smoothers in general). You will notice from just these few pictures how much work is involved.

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An enormous set up for a tiny component

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Planing the end off to initiate a 15 deg angle

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Milling out the integral rivets at the same 15 deg.

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The finished item

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You can pick out where this item belongs

Over the years I have and many enquiries for this No 98 plane which I hadn’t been able to fulfill. So those of you who want one this is your only chance to get one. Just making a few. See my website for pricing.

July 6, 2017

Window to my Workshop 115

Filed under: Drawings,No 983 block plane — Tags: , , , — admin @ 9:04 am

In conversations over the years I have always been praised for my (primitive) drawings as CAD is the way now. (See the dinsaour card on my Facebook page – thank you David) I have never had to time to learn CAD. The hardest thing was to learn an early Heidenhain control unit for my mill. I am just starting a new batch (yes, I know I am supposed to be retiring :-) ) of these No 983 planes, mainly because I sold the last one which was mine, I am going to use this opportunity to explain some of the workings in more depth. Maybe because I am getting older the work seems to expand but I have never allowed economic restraints to get in the way.

Going back through some of my drawings, which are very untidy, I decided to post some up. Starting with this side layout of the No 983 – warts and all. This is how I work and then I have to convert it into a suitable dialogue for my Heidenhain. Luckily I am the only person who has to understand this.

No 983 outline 1

June 9, 2017

Window to my workshop 113

A photo of the infills before they go into their bodies. This Snakewood has had six coats of danish oil. As with previous work using Snakewood it hasn’t cracked whilst building up the danish oil. It does look a bit good.

CI3A3622

July 17, 2015

Window to my Workshop 93

Filed under: No 984,Window to my workshop — Tags: , — admin @ 5:27 pm

The blades arrived back from heat treatment and after many hours grinding and polishing they are now finished. Just packing them in oiled paper until the planes are ready.

Holtey No 984 n

The hardening is the only thing I outsource. Everything else is made inhouse.

July 7, 2015

Window to my Workshop 91

Filed under: No 984,Window to my workshop — Tags: , — admin @ 5:03 pm

A little bit more of my daily drudge :-( and a little bit more pain.
 
Holtey No 984 h
 

Holtey No 984 i
 
Holtey No 984 j
 
This is not so kind on my mill. I use 4 cutters in the forming of this detail for the front and rear bow. When the milling operation is complete there will be at least two days polishing them. Lots of sore hands and fingers. The last time I did this (on No 983), I had to have my hand stitched up by the local doctor.

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