From the Workshop

February 5, 2019

Workshop blog 7 – No 985

Filed under: No 985,Window to my workshop — Tags: , , , — admin @ 10:44 am

I have spent a long time on my drawing board this year working on a new design – designated No 985 which will be part of my range of non-infill planes, which I very much prefer. This smoother is a non-adjuster type plane which means a reduction in work as the adjuster is a big item – both to make and accommodate, which will show in the price. Some people prefer a non-adjuster plane and I have not made this on a full handled plane before.

This plane is to be made from 416 stainless steel which is expensive and flat sections cannot be sourced in the UK. My experience with this alloy is that it is the best for my purposes. It is also preferred for making rifle barrels. It is very nice for working with and has a lovely texture to it. And I can stick it on a magnetic chuck for surface grinding.

Whilst waiting for the stainless to arrive I have made a start on the handles.

Holtey No 985 smoother plane

This is an area in which feedback would be greatly appreciated. Since I am making a smoothing plane my objective is to keep it as short as possible. A lot of the older planes were 7 1/2″ long which makes sense for finishing purposes. However, these planes were usually handleless, which can be uncomfortable to use. Once you introduce a handle it is going to increase the length. As this is a non-infill plane I will be using a round bun, which also needs a little bit of extra room. I would like to make the handles short for use with three fingers plus the index finger resting on the side of the blade. What I want feedback on is would you prefer a taller handle so you can use four fingers which will make the plane longer, or do you prefer three fingers and a shorter plane?

For those who have experienced my No 98 they will have noticed how comfortable the handle is as it has plenty of room for four fingers
- http://holteyplanes.com/. However, it is better to have the plane shorter if you are going to use it for smoothing/finishing.

If I use the taller handle the plane will be 8 3/4″ long or 8″ with the shorter handle.

A lot of modern smoothing planes seem to be about 9 1/2″ long which is neither a smoother or a panel plane – needs redefining.

Holtey No 985 handle templates

My handles are all hand made and I make several templates to find the one I am happy with.

January 10, 2019

New Workshop 6

Blades for the No 98 hardened, tempered, cryogenically treated and now ground and polished. Pictures of finished planes to follow shortly.

Holtey No 98 blades

December 7, 2018

New Workshop 4

Just a few more pictures as I get near to finishing these new No 98 planes

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November 27, 2018

New Workshop blog 2 (post retirement)

Some more components for the No 98 plane. Showing the integral rivets being cut in situ

finishing cut on bun boss

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Finished items are the front and rear handle bosses. All in stainless steel as usual.

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November 26, 2018

New Workshop blog 1 (post retirement ????)

Filed under: No 98 plane,Window to my workshop — Tags: , , , — admin @ 4:14 pm

During the course of finishing off bits and pieces out of the back of the cupboard I decided I would put together some more No 98 planes. I was horrified to find not all the pieces there. However, I had already promised a plane to someone so I need to get on with it.

I am just making components as I need them. I will start with some pictures of the adjuster boss and post as I go. This No 98 plane was the start of my own designs (and the start of bevel up smoothers in general). You will notice from just these few pictures how much work is involved.

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An enormous set up for a tiny component

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Planing the end off to initiate a 15 deg angle

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Milling out the integral rivets at the same 15 deg.

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The finished item

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You can pick out where this item belongs

Over the years I have and many enquiries for this No 98 plane which I hadn’t been able to fulfill. So those of you who want one this is your only chance to get one. Just making a few. See my website for pricing.

June 8, 2016

Window to my Workshop 105

Filed under: No 984,Window to my workshop — Tags: , — admin @ 10:14 am

With all my component parts finished I was just left with some wooden handles which should have been finished off earlier as they need to be oiled and cured.

It seems an opportunity to show that there is a lot of hand work in my planes.

Now there is the fitting, milling, grinding and final tweaking. So Claire had better get those baize bags done.
 
Holtey No 984 handle a
 
Thought I would mention that the riffler I am using here is one of Noel Liogier’s. It is probably about the only one I have come across that can handle these exotic hard woods without getting tired. In fact it is so efficient that I am having to learn not to be so heavy handed. I would really recommend these rifflers because I have always had a problem with shaping some of these hard exotic woods. The double ended rifflers were given to me when I was exhibiting in Munich in 1998 by Zoltanne Nagy – they have served me very well but unfortunately I can’t find anymore to replace them. Noel’s are supplied with fitted handles.

 
Holtey No 984 handle b
 
Next posting will be of the finished plane.

January 22, 2016

window to my workshop 102

Filed under: No 984,Window to my workshop — Tags: , — admin @ 4:13 pm

Lever caps assembly now finished

 
Sorry for the slow progress to those that are waiting, but life is not getting better at the moment. I have my mother’s funeral to go to next week and I also have to make a decision about whether to put down my very poorly dog.
 

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January 11, 2016

Window to my Workshop 101

Filed under: No 984,Window to my workshop — Tags: , — admin @ 9:25 am

More later ….

 
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November 30, 2015

Window to my workshop No 99

Filed under: No 984 — Tags: , , — admin @ 10:52 am

LEVER CAP

As with many of my components these are fabricated from solid bar. The three pictures shown below are starting from a raw bar, removing the excess and shaping then the finished product.

 

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This has probably been one of the most labour intensive of all the parts. Now that they are done, with the exception of polishing (which is no mean feat), I am very happy to move on to the thumb wheel and pressure pad.
 
Update: A modification has been made for ergonomic purposes. An additional chamfer has been added in case there is any contact with fingers or knuckles.
 
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September 16, 2015

Window to my Workshop 97

Filed under: No 984,Window to my workshop — Tags: , — admin @ 6:38 pm

Sorry for the long gap, and probably a few photo opportunities missed. Now on to the bottoms of the No 984.
 
Holtey No 984 pic 1

 
I had to make many visits to the drawing board to finalise the drilling for the handles, as I felt paranoia was setting in and a lot of double checking and tweaking was needed here. As you can see I have five holes to receive the 5 mm integral rivets for the front bun fixture. It may look a little excessive but I have seen what happens if a plane is dropped and lands on the bun. The original No 98 had three rivets. Four wasn’t right but five just seems to be correct. I always work in odd numbers for some reason. Funnily all office chairs have 5 feet.
 
Holtey No 984 pic 2
 
For the rear tote I shall use 2 x 6 mm rivets, which are integral to its chair. This is one area that I have thought long and hard on, making this fixture as tough as possible. It is very limited by its parameter of being an open handle. This arrangement will be as strong as you will ever need. In the event of any impact the handle will be the first thing to break – so best not drop it – but it is wood after all. The handle can be replaced. With these two holes I am now committed, the rest of the handle will be tweaked a bit before I start.
 
Holtey No 984 pic 3
 
This is my holding arrangement for the integral rivets on the bottom of the plane. This was my second attempt, as I was not confident with the rigidity of the original arrangement. The setting up is where most of the work takes place.
 
Holtey No 984 pic 4
 
With all my milling and drilling I always use the very best tools available. These rivets are cut full depth in one go to get the most use out of the cutter. This first cut is taken with a ripper which will cut the rivets slightly oversize and then follow up with a finishing tool, which will size and texture the rivets. It takes a lot of trial and error to get the optimum spindle speed and feed rate. The best instruments for this are my eyes and ears. It has taken me a long time to perfect this and these are the last planes just when everything is coming together.
 
Holtey No 984 pic 5
 
The last operation with the rivets is applying a very small chamfer which helps to prevent any splits forming whilst peining.
 
Holtey No 984 pic 6
 
The riveting finished.

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