From the Workshop

November 20, 2019

Workshop blog no 25 No 985

This is the last chance to take this kind of picture before I assemble the planes. I cannot possible imagine anyone else ever going down this route. As with all my planes it has to be better than the one that proceeded it. This is the last 10 I am assembling. To quote a maxim – when they’re gone they’re gone.

CI3A6287

November 14, 2019

Workshop Blog no 24 – No 985

Stainless steel bolts for the No 985. 250 of them. All handmade. Never want to see one again. I would be embarrassed to say how long they took. It is important that they were made to a high precision, but will be hidden when the work is finished.

There are only a small number of these planes unsold

20191108_102128

20191108_112150

20191113_133727

September 20, 2019

Workshop blog no 33

Looks like I have started a new family here, there are all limited editions only

CI3A6200

September 19, 2019

Workshop blog no 32 – No 985

It has been a very long journey but at last the planes are ready. I have always said that I try to improve over the preceding planes which is always a difficulty and this one clearly does it.

CI3A6187

CI3A6169

September 18, 2019

Workshop blog no 31 – No 985

Another picture which I missed out yesterday

20190918_101411

August 24, 2019

Workshop Blog 28 – No 985

Filed under: No 985,Window to my workshop — Tags: , , , — admin @ 11:23 am

Showing the bottom blade bed modified to stop the blade passing through the mouth.

20190815_095616

August 18, 2019

Workshop Blog 27 – No 985

Filed under: No 985,Window to my workshop — Tags: , , — admin @ 4:50 pm

Just thought I would put this picture up of the No 985 smoother in its chrysalis form, still some work to go but on course to be completed for the end of the month.

CI3A5825

June 7, 2019

Workshop Blog 26 – No 985

dalbergia stevensonii better known as Honduran Rosewood

Over the years using various selected rosewoods this one has captivated me the most. It is not a bling wood, but it has an attraction of its own. It is very tough and business like. The contrast does not fade like many of the others. It takes an oil very well. No matter how plain it may look there is a hidden beauty that reveals itself quite quickly once you start shaping and fine finishing. This is an area where I find a lot of satisfaction and reward for all the effort that goes into the work. There is one downside to all rosewoods – I have an allergy to it. This Honduran one used to be the least offensive but after many hours of work it has turned on me.

This handle represents the end of the bunch and where only hand finishing counts.

CI3A5440

June 3, 2019

Workshop Blog 25 – No 985

Still plodding along.

The first picture is to try and give you some idea of the work that goes into these planes. The picture should be self explanatory. It shows some of the metal (stainless) work and handles. From this you can see it includes spines that are threaded and keyed ready for cementing with epoxy into the handles. This gives the kind of strength and rigidity which would surpass what is normally found on a closed handle.

It is this kind of work that makes me one of life’s misfits.

 

CI3A5426
 

Now I am on to the handle shaping which is basic hand work. My CNC machine doesn’t seem to have a button for this job. I find pleasure in the wood taking shape and interesting contrasts come to life.

Here the chosen wood is a Honduras Rosewood – Dalbergia stevensonii – still lots of work to be done. The price of the plane goes up and up with the pain of the work.

 

CI3A5429

May 23, 2019

Workshop Blog No 24 – No 985

Slipping behind on postings as I have been so busy.

As a follow on from last posting on upper blade bed, the design is similar to the one used in my No 982. I didn’t want to go this far but I can’t think of anything better. It is certainly solid if nothing else. You just have to bite the bullet and get the work done.

CI3A5417

 
 

CI3A5402

 
 

This picture shows the tooling required for the last part of the operation after much preparation. As you can see this kind of tooling doesn’t come cheap. I always keep plenty of backup – if I get a tool failure I want to be able to change it immediately.

 

CI3A5407

Older Posts »

Powered by WordPress